Buddhist Living

Milam Sleep Yoga: lucid dreaming can bring us closer to experiencing non-dualistic “reality” than waking meditation

"You should know all phenomena are like dreams." — Shakyamuni Buddha. Unless we are Yogis or Yoginis, the closest we are likely to come to an inciteful appreciation of Emptiness and the true nature of phenomenon might actually ...

“Dharma in motion”: Buddhism, Vajrayana Buddhist Tantra and Zen have as much in common with martial arts as religion?

Siddartha Buddha grew up in the palace and was an expert in martial arts. Premise: Buddhism, Vajrayana Tantra and Zen have as much in common with martial arts as it does with religion. Second Premise: Martial arts skills ...

Buddha Weekly named among top 3 Buddhist magazines by Feedspot under the category “Best 5 Buddhist Magazines”

Buddha Weekly was ranked number 3 on Feedspot's Top 5 Buddhist Magazines list. The volunteer writers, editors, video editors, graphic designers and researchers at Buddha Weekly are thrilled to hear that Buddha Weekly has been placed under "Top ...

84,000 doors to Enlightenment: mystical Buddhist, Zen Buddhist, intellectual Buddhist, devotional Buddhist, hipster Buddhist: many doors, one destination

Buddha taught many skilful means or paths. In Buddhism, these are typically described with the vehicle, path or doors metaphors. In the Pali Canon, it is said "There are 84,000 doors to Enlightenment" [5]. Clearly, in Buddha's time, ...

Transforming demons; “Get thee behind me Mara!”: how Buddhism handles demons; from mindfulness meditation to transformation — but no exorcisms

The great Yogini Machig Labdron. Shakyamuni Buddha, raised among Brahmins (priests) and kings, left the palace behind and sat under the Bodhi Tree to face his inner demons. Of course, his mission wasn't to exorcise devils and demons; ...

Reclaim your mental well-being from addiction: special contributor feature

Editor's Intro: Buddhists emphasize meditation and mind in many practices, in part, to help us overcome attachments. Whether it's addiction, or repetitive behaviours and attachments, destructive cravings are a major issue in today's stress-filled world. Special contributor Adam ...

The Lion’s Gaze and the Lion’s Roar: Padmasambhava, Milarepa and Buddha’s lion wisdom even more relevant in today’s hectic world

Milarepa, the great sage in Tibet. The Lion's Gaze parable is, perhaps, more meaningful in today's hectic world, than it was in Ancient Tibet. Today, anger, fury, social unrest, and dissatisfaction make The Lion's Gaze a very relevant ...

How the Thai Cave Rescue inspires us as both humans, and Buddhists

Dedication: I would like to dedicate this article to the rescuers, the 12 boys, their football coach and especially to the memory of Thai Navy Seal Saman Kunan whose bravery and sacrifice were a credit to humanity. May ...

Having trouble focusing during meditation? Lack of sleep may be the issue; 70 million US adults suffer a sleep disorder

According to the American Sleep Association, 50-70 million US adults have a sleep disorder. This doesn't just result in poor performance at work, drowsy and dangerous driving, and major health issues — it may be preventing you from ...

In this time of contagious insults and flaming on social media, Buddha has good advice: “If I do not get insulted, then the anger falls back on you.”

In today's world of instant tweets and social media, insults propigate almost with a flaming will of their own. And those words find instant audiences on Twitter, spreading the anger, the fury, the insults, hurting, hurting and hurting. But, ...

Benefits obtained from wealth for householders: Adiya Sutta — righteously obtained and righteously used, wealth is not negative karma as long as “I have done what will not lead to future distress”

Many people misinterpret Buddhist beliefs, associating money or wealth as a source of attachment or negativity — particularly focusing on the ideal of renuciation. For the non-monastic — for the devout householder Buddhist — wealth is not itself ...

The Importance of Ahimsa non-violence in Buddhism — “Nonviolence is the weapon of the strong.”

“Monks, even if bandits were to sever you savagely limb by limb with a two-handle saw, he who gave rise to a mind of hate towards them would not be carrying out my teaching” — Shakyamuni Buddha [4] ...