Why Dhamma (Dharma) is the most important of the Three Jewels: “The Dhamma is our arbitrator” — Ananada in the Gopaka Moggallana Sutta

One of the most unique and captivating of Pali Suttas actually records events after Buddha passed away. Why, then, if Buddha is not teaching, is this interesting? Aside from the fascinating historical perspective, it carries a vey profound ...

If you have time for only one Buddhist Practice — recite Diamond Sutra, or Vajra Cutter Sutra; containing the four main points of Mahayana practice — unlimited merit according to many teachers: full text of the Sutra

Recitation of the Diamond Sutra, or Vajra Cutter, is a vital indispensable practice, as recommended by many teachers, from His Holiness the Dalai Lama, to the great teacher Lama Zopa Rinpoche — to nearly every Mahayana teacher of ...

The Five Strengths and Powers or pañcabalā in Buddhism — the qualities conducive to Enlightenment: faith, energy, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom

The Five Strengths (Sanskrit, Pali: pañcabalā) in Buddhism — critical to our progress on the path to enlightenment — are: faith, energy, mindfulness, concentration, and wisdom. They are one of the seven sets of Bodhipakkhiyadhamma ("qualities conducive to enlightenment"). You may wonder ...

Amitabha Sutra: His practice is easy and welcoming, and his merits are so vast that all beings can benefit

"When I have attained Buddhahood, if those beings who are in the ten quarters should believe in me with serene thoughts, and should wish to be born in my country, and should have, say, ten times thought of ...

Not Yours! “Whatever is not yours: let go of it.” — letting go of past, letting go of future: Na Tumhaka Sutta

One of the most popular short Suttas, often presented as a "must read" to new Buddhists is the famous "Not Yours" Sutta or what I like to call the "Letting Go" Sutta. Although Na Tumhaka Sutta is really ...

Vyagghapajja Sutta — Buddha: “These four conditions, conducive to a householder’s happiness…” Buddha teaches the lay followers

In Vyagghapajja Sutta, a concise but profound sutra, Shakyamuni Buddha answers his lay followers on how to develop the four conditions conducive to householder's happiness. The representatives of the laypeople attending asked "O Lord, let the Exalted One ...

Sutra of the ten ways of being free: the Discourse on the Ten Wholesome Ways of Action

In this beautiful Sutra, Buddha delivers one of his most important and concise deliveries of the "ten ways of being free": What are the ten? 1]. One gives universally to all beings without fear 2]. One always has ...

Vyākaraṇaparivarta vyākaraṇa – “prophecy” or “prediction” chapter 6 of the Lotus Sutra

Editors Note: This is chapter 6 in our ongoing series on the Lotus Sutra, the famous "Prophecy" chapter of the Lotus Sutra. This is the chapter in which Buddha' predicts future Buddhahood for the four students featured in ...

Prajnaparamita Yum Chenmo, the Face of Perfection: Wisdom Personified, “Emptiness is Form” Manifested: Great Mother of Wisdom

Why do we call Prajnaparamita — and Her Emanations, such as Tara — the Mother of the Buddhas? Is Prajnaparamita a Sutra or a Goddess or both? Venerable Zasep Rinpoche explained, "Prajnaparamita means 'The Perfection of Wisdom’ in Mahayana ...

“It is I, Rāhula”; “I see,” said the Buddha — the story of Buddha’s son whose name means “shackle”

As the founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama Buddha's life story has been retold and reimagined countless times. But what about his only son, Rāhula? Born between 34 BCE and 451 BCE, Rāhula was the son of Prince Siddhartha ...

Lotus Sutra Chapter 5 — Parable of the Medicinal Plants, “all beings are nourished by Buddha Dharma”: full English translation.

The focus of this parable: “All beings are nourished by the Buddha Dharma and have Buddha Nature, although they grow into Buddhahood at their own pace.” What are the symbols in this parable? Parables as told by Buddha ...

Lotus Sutra Chapter 4: Parable of the “Lost Vagabond Son” — second of seven parables: full English translation

"Buddhahood is our inheritance, and the only thing preventing us from claiming that inheritance is ourselves, our own limited view of our ourselves, our low self-esteem, our lack of confidence, our lack of imagination, our sense of inadequacy..." ...
Translate »
Scroll to Top