Who needs a Dharma Protector? Isn’t Buddhist Refuge or Green Tara Enough Protection?
Report: Buddha Weekly’s Top 50 Features this Month (March 2021)
21 Taras Surya Gupta Thanka — stunning art by Angeli Lhadripa Shkonda: interview featuring 21 Tara closeups
Veneration Practice and Devotion According to the Ksitigarbha Sutra: Why Devotion is Not Superstition
The True Dragon in Buddhism — What do you do if a “dragon” appears in your bedroom? The importance of practice — and Dragons
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Buddha Weekly's Latest Features

Medicine Buddha Sutra: video audio recitation of full Sutta — listening or reciting is a very empowering healing practice

Jason Espada recites the full Medicine Buddha Sutra, here, in a video with wonderful Medicine Buddha images, illustrations Tangkhas and statues for visual contemplation. Reciting or listening to the Medicine Buddha Sutra is a very empowering healing practice. Jason Espada — known for compiling the much treasured A Buddhist Library, and his...

Vegetarianism Should be a Global Priority: New Research from World Resources Institute Demonstrates Devastating Environmental Impact of Meat Industry

Yet another well-researched report reinforces the devastating environmental impact of the meat industry — as we previously reported in Buddha Weekly, in our feature "Five Ways Vegetarianism Could Save the World." At the time we published the story a small minority of readers suggested our numbers were exaggerated. This report, together with several others,...

Drumming for mindfulness and healing: a simple way to calm the mind, remove stress and heal. Studies show drum meditation supports treatments of cancer, Parkinsons and depression.

Psychology and science have identified both drumming and mindfulness meditation as helpful therapy for everything from stress to memory loss to supportive cancer care. This is not new science. Since the time of Shakyamuni Buddha, we have known about the stress-reducing benefits of both mindfulness and drumming. Bringing the two together — mindfulness...

Part 3: Zasep Tulku Rinpoche discusses how to find a teacher; why its important to meditate on death; how to start with Deity Yoga; how wrathful Deities can be misunderstood; and the role of internet in Dharma teachings.

Buddha Weekly continues its special series “Interviews with the Teachers” with part 3 of an extensive hours-long interview with the most Venerable Zasep Tulku Rinpoche. Rinpoche is spiritual director of many temples, meditation centres and retreat centres in Australia, the United States and Canada and teaches also in Mexico and Mongolia. Future scheduled teachings...

Part 2 of Interview with the Teachers: Zasep Tulku Rinpoche discusses how Buddhism can help with today’s problems; on how we should think of hell realms and reincarnation; and how to practice when you have so little time.

Buddha Weekly continues its special series “Interviews with the Teachers” with part 2 of an extensive hours-long interview with the most Venerable Zasep Tulku Rinpoche. Rinpoche is spiritual director of many temples, meditation centres and retreat centres in Australia, the United States and Canada and teaches also in Mexico and Mongolia.  He is also...

Buddha Weekly Special: Interviews with the Buddhist Teachers — Zasep Tulku Rinpoche

Buddha Weekly begins its special series "Interviews with the Teachers" with an extensive hours-long interview with the most Venerable Zasep Tulku Rinpoche. Rinpoche is spiritual director of many temples, meditation centres and retreat centres in Australia, the United States and Canada and teaches also in Mexico and Mongolia. He was first invited to...

Namaste: Respect Overcomes Pride, a Universal Greeting, and a Sign of Reverence

To many Buddhists, "Namaste" is more than a commonly spoken greeting. It is not just a salutation, it's a sign of genuine respect and good will. More importantly, bowing to another helps us overcome the obstacle of pride, a major obstacle to Buddhist practice. The mudra Anjali, which is associated with "Namaste"—the hands...

“Designer Dharma” or “Dharma-Lite”—What the teachers say about picking and choosing Buddhist core beliefs such as rebirth and karma

" The eightfold path is often represented as a wheel with eight spokes. Pick a wheel with just one or two and it won't take you very far." — Mark Vernon [13] "Some traditional Buddhist teachers tend to serve "Dharma-Lite" like "Coca-Cola Lite," rather than "the Real Thing" Dharma," said Alexander Berzin...

What the Teachers Say About Emptiness: Removing “Lazy Nihilism” from Shunyata — or “How Deep the Rabbit Hole goes” and “How Big is the Moon?”

What do big moons, lazy nihilists and rabbit holes have to do with Shunyata? Yesterday I read a feature on Space.com which became the inspiration of this feature: "The 'Big Moon' Illusion May All Be in Your Head," by Joe Rao. This led to rabbit holes and lazy nihilism. Bear with me, I come back...

The Psychology of Buddhist Prostrations: The Humble Bow, a Meaningful Method to Connect with Buddha Nature

Many modern Buddhists are hesitant to practice ancient physical methods—prostrations, mudras, physical offerings—and can often only be convinced if they can somehow psychologically rationalize it. For example, deity practice is often "psychologically" categorized as "making a connection with your inner Self"—Buddha Nature in Buddhism, "Self" in Jungian psychology.   [caption id="attachment_5940" align="aligncenter"...

The Better Way: Standing Meditation? For those with injuries, arthritis or a sleepy mind, standing can help us achieve mindfulness

"You can meditate walking, standing, sitting or lying down" Buddhist monk Noah Yuttadhammo. "Standing is a moderate form, and can be used to calm you down or wake you up." For some of us, with sports injuries, arthritis or conditions that prohibit lengthy sitting, standing meditation is a better way to achieve...

Buddhism Could Now Be the 2nd Largest Spiritual Path with 1.6 Billion or 22% of the World’s Population According to Some Recent Studies

Buddhism has never been a "propagation" spirituality. Actively seeking out "converts" is discouraged for the most part. Individual spirituality is emphasized more than group activities. Some people don't even think of Buddhism as a "religion"—certainly not an organized religion with dogma. So, it is with sense of optimism—without pride or attachment?—that we...