Buddha Weekly: Buddhist Practices, Mindfulness, Meditation

Bringing Happiness to Others on Wesak Day: Buddha’s Birthday

Guatama Buddha on Shrine

Temple statue of Shakyamuni Buddha, the historical Buddha, with offerings and decorations for celebrating Wesak, the Buddha’s Birthday.

On the most precious day of Wesak, we celebrate not only the birth, but ask the enlightenment, and Parinarvana of Guatama Buddha. Also known as Saka Dawa (Tibetan), Vesakha, Buddha Pumima, and Buddha Jyanti, we celebrate the life and teachings of the Buddha by bringing happiness to others. Affectionately known as Buddha’s Birthday, we traditionally make extra efforts to help the unfortunate, poor, sick and aged, and engage in karma yoga activities including cleaning and painting gompas and temples, painting thanks, and feasting on vegetarian food—all in homage to The Enlightened One.

In many traditions and countries, today, May 25, is Wesak, although the date varies due to lunar calendar variances between cultures and traditions. In Theravada traditions, we typically celebrate on the full moon in the 5th or 6th month, while in China and Korea Buddha’s Birthday might be on the eight of the fourth month in the Chinese lunar calendar.

Celebrating Vesakha
Typically, devout Buddhists will assemble at a temple or gompa before dawn for ceremonies and honouring of the Holy Three Jewels: the Buddha, the Dharma (Buddha’s teachings) and the Sangha (the Buddhist disciples and followers). Traditional offerings of flowers, water, incense are laid at the feet of the Buddha. On this day, there can be no killing of any kind if possible, and most eat only vegetarian food for the day. Even if the devout Buddhist is a lay practitioner, on days such as Wesak, we typically observe the eight Precepts as training in morality and humility, rather than just the five lay precepts:
1.    I undertake to abstain from causing harm and taking life of any kind/
2.    I undertake to abstain from taking what is not given.
3.    I undertake to abstain from sexual misconduct.
4.    I undertake to abstain from wrong speech: telling lies, deceiving others, manipulating others, using hurtful words.
5.    I undertake to abstain from using intoxicating drinks and drugs, which lead to carelessness.
The additional precepts on Wesak and other special ceremonial days (or for non-lay practitioners all the time) are:
6.    I undertake to abstain from eating at the wrong time—the correct time is after sunrise but before noon.
7.    I undertake to abstain from singing, dancing, playing music, attending entertainment performances, wearing perfume, and using cosmetics and garlands or decorations.
8.    I undertake to abstain from luxurious places for sitting or sleeping, and overindulging in sleep.

Buddha Gautama

Shakyamuni Buddha, the current Buddha of our time, is honored by follower’s respect for the Dharma, His Teachings.

Homage to the Buddha
Guatama Buddha, the historical Buddha of our time, instructed us to pay homage to Him by sincerely following His teachings, the Dharma. Although offerings and flowers are respectful, genuine homage to Siddartha Buddha is conveyed by conduct. On Wesak, we renew our promises to follow the Dharma, to lead noble lives, to cultivate Bodhichitta, to develop wisdom, and—of overwhelming importance—practice loving kindness.

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